Error message

Deprecated function: The each() function is deprecated. This message will be suppressed on further calls in _menu_load_objects() (line 579 of /home/utweb/utw10529/public_html/includes/menu.inc).

LaMontagne Center for Infectious Disease

alt="CID"

Our Mission is...
to bridge the gap between basic and translational research into microbial and viral pathogenesis. Learn More

Founding.

Understanding the biological principles that underlie the mechanisms by which infectious agents adapt to and undermine the defense mechanisms of a host organism is critical for the development of therapeutic agents to fight disease. The LaMontagne Center for Infectious Disease conducts basic and translational research into the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of bacterial, viral, parasitic, or fungal infections and strategies for their prophylaxis and therapy. The LaMontagne Center was established at The University of Texas at Austin in November 2013 as the Center for Infectious Disease (CID) and was renamed just over three years later for scientist and public health champion John Ring LaMontagne.  The LaMontagne Center, while located within the College of Natural Sciences, is composed of highly interdisciplinary researchers spanning at least four colleges: Natural Sciences, Engineering, Pharmacy, and the Dell Medical School.

Infectious Disease News

'Last Resort' Antibiotic Pops Bacteria Like Balloons A 70-year mystery has finally been solved and the solution could help in the fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria. A new study led by researchers at Imperial College London, and including UT Austin's Despoina Mavridou, reveals that colistin, a last resort antibiotic "punches holes in bacteria, causing them to pop like balloons." Published i...
Our Immune Systems Blanket the SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein with Antibodies An analysis of blood plasma samples from people who recovered from SARS-CoV-2 infections shows that most of the antibodies circulating in the blood -- on average, about 84% -- target areas of the viral spike protein outside the receptor binding domain (RBD, green), including the N-terminal Domain (NTD, blue) and the S2 subunit (red, yellow). Illustration credit: University of Texas at Austin.

The most complete picture yet is coming into focus of how antibodies produced in people who effectively fight off SARS-CoV-2 work to neutralize the part of the virus responsible for causing infection. In the journal Science, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin describe the finding, which represents good news for designing the next generation of vaccines to protect against variants of the virus or future emerging coronaviruses.

Hepatitis C Drugs Boost Remdesivir’s Antiviral Activity Against COVID-19 Drugs used to treat hepatitis C render remdesivir 10 times better at inhibiting the coronavirus in cell cultures, according to new study. Illustration credit: Jenna Luecke/University of Texas at Austin.

Remdesivir is currently the only antiviral drug approved in the U.S. for treating COVID-19 patients. In a paper published this week in Cell Reports, researchers from The University of Texas at Austin, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai showed that four drugs used to treat hepatitis C render remdesivir 10 times better at inhibiting the coronavirus in cell cultures.

Undetected Coronavirus Variant Was in at Least 15 Countries Before its Discovery Illustration: Jenna Luecke

A highly contagious SARS-CoV-2 variant was unknowingly spreading for months in the United States by October 2020, according to a new study from researchers with The University of Texas at Austin COVID-19 Modeling Consortium. Scientists first discovered it in early December in the United Kingdom, where the highly contagious and more lethal variant is thought to have originated. The journal Emerging Infectious Diseases, which has published an early-release version of the study, provides evidence that the coronavirus variant B117 (501Y) had spread across the globe undetected for months when scientists discovered it.

Mary K. Estes, PH. D.

Lecture Series - March 23rd, 2020 - MARY K. ESTES, PH.D.

Distinguished Professor of Virology and Microbiology Baylor College of Medicine.
Where: Etter-Harbin Alumni Center on UT-Austin Main Campus

experimental vaccine against RSV

Quisque massa mauris

Mauris arcu purus, blandit id dictum at, tristique a metus. Proin in arcu neque.

HIV Hidden in Patients' Cells

Aliquam erat volutpat.

Ut id ullamcorper ipsum, et porttitor neque. Donec sodales bibendum enim ac interdum.

May 10, 2021

Priceless Astronomy Data Saved After Collapse of Arecibo Telescope

AUSTIN, Texas — When Puerto Rico’s famed Arecibo telescope collapsed in 2020, astronomers lost access to one of the world’s most treasured pieces of equipment – but also, potentially, decades of priceless data holding still undiscovered secrets about the

Read more
May 10, 2021

UT Austin Studies Mysterious Substance that Could Transform the Future of Energy

In 2017, UT Austin geoscientists led the first U.S. university-based expedition to the Gulf of Mexico in search of methane hydrates

Read more
May 10, 2021

New Technique Predicts Response of Brain Tumors to Chemoradiation

AUSTIN, Texas — A team studying malignant brain tumors has developed a new technique for predicting how individual patients will respond to chemoradiation, a major step forward in efforts to personalize cancer treatment

Read more
View all news